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When I was a kid, mom taught me so much. Once, when helping me learn to count by 25s, she ever-so-subtly imparted the critical life skill of determined persistence. Take 2-mins to hear my
Mom’s Day gratitude (https://youtu.be/47f8Sua74MI), no matter what day it is. Mom knew how to do that math, and she was patient enough to sit with me and guide me so I could do it too. That experience taught me math and more. It taught me good career goals.

Good career goals make for top performance (& rewards)

  • Know the game being played (it’s probably not what you think..)
  • Know how to play it good enough & get better
  • Gain reliable allies & teammates
  • Make fast, high-quality decisions, even when faced with ambiguity
  • Get the best results possible
  • Do your post mortem reflection so next time can be better
  • CELEBRATE the wins you got!

My Story

I grew up a mystical Christian kid, running around the woods with my little brothers and the neighbor kids, so fascinated with how cool God* made the world, I had to learn all about it. Studied science and math (thanks to mom & dad). It’s the best friend of us — keeps us out of the abyss of wild speculation.
* feel free to substitute suitable to your beliefs

First in my family to get past high school, I graduated university in physics & math, getting my first professional position because I knew more quantum mechanics than anyone else (really geek). On the analysis team at work, I assessed nuclear threat to the U.S. mainland from the then USSR.

At first I thought working hard and doing great work were good career goals. They are, though sadly for me, my list was, shall we say, incomplete. I wasn’t getting the traction I wanted. So I wondered …

How can I move up into the next level or two?

In case you’ve wondered this too, you’ll be glad to know THE conversation in C-Suites across the land is the “How do we get more diversity in our senior and executive ranks?

They know that when their workforce reflects their customer-base, they have a much better chance of connecting with their customers.That means every corporation in America is competing for YOU. Are you ready?

I knew how to produce good work. What university hadn’t taught me was how to read my workplace so I could rise in my workplace. And I didn’t know how to set good career goals so I could move up.

While I liked analysis, I was NOT going to be stuck there for years, let alone decades. I was ready for something new — but what would a promotion look like? What would I do?, What skills and knowledge must I have to be “ready enough”?

Dr Weiss knew how to do it in academia, rising from Professor to Physics Department Chair. (The machine in the back is a really cool matter-antimatter annihilator he and my colleague Rene’ Holaday built. A study in the finer points of the universe.)

Do you sometimes wonder like I did? Maybe you’re asking yourself “What does it take to move up around here, anyway?” Or maybe you’d love a raise.

Read on…

Good Career Goals

Good Career Goals

I was somewhere between uncomfortable-and-mortified at the thought of being stuck in one position too long. But how to move out of a “doing” role and into a leading role? I needed to …

  • Know the game being played (probably still not what you’d think..)
  • Know how to play it good enough & get better
  • Gain reliable allies & teammates
  • Make fast, high-quality decisions, even when faced with ambiguity
  • Get the best result possible
  • Do your post mortem reflection so next time can be better
  • CELEBRATE the wins you got!

But how? Back to Mom … how she mentored me, showed me the steps, stayed with me every step of the way?

That’s what I didn’t have. My mom the homemaker and Avon lady didn’t know the corporate game. Nor my dad the Naval avionics mechanic (though it was fun to hang out in the garage with him, fetching tools & learning to fix stuff).

I established some mentor relationships with my professional engineering colleagues. The generations ahead of me were all men. The place made “Hidden Figures” seem like a diversity bonanza (ugh..).
NOTE To Self: When a potential mentor talks about anything but how to move up, that’s a hint they’re interested in you, but not aligned on your professional abilities or future. That can’t help you. Move on.

I have to admit that being new to it, I asked questions that seemed right to me, but weren’t.

Later …

I finally figured it out, but OUCH, had the years flown by. That cost me countless years of opportunity and worse, earning power. Earnings that would have compounded, had I learned early on what was needed and useful.

It breaks my heart is to see talented women* struggling like I did.
* Men too. These strategies work for anyone, and I totally admit that women are my focus.

I wanted to seize the day.

Now you can. Schedule your call, it’s on me https://calendly.com/yes-4/sessionwithdorothy/ 

I appreciate you,
Dorothy

PS — Not yet a free member? Missed a recent event*? Get career-advancing tips and tools at https://dorothykuhn.com/gift
* Sign up to get access to free trainings, challenges, ask-a-thons and more!

PPS – Ready to see what I want to hear Your Challenges & Good Career Goals
I’m all ears for you –> https://form.jotform.com/81026228254148
Especially concerning your next raise, position, promotion!

Check out more valuable Career Advancing posts from Dorothy …

International Wireless Communications Expo        Captivating Your Audience is Not About Your Looks

 

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